COMMUNICATION KIT

COMMUNICATION KIT

COMMUNICATION KIT

COMMUNICATION KIT

How do you explain cancer to children?

How do you explain cancer to children?

How do you explain cancer to children?

How do you explain cancer to children?

How do you explain cancer to children?

The challenge

The challenge

The challenge

The challenge

In Switzerland, 250 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. It is the leading cause of death by illness among children. Swiss Cancer Associations make visits to classrooms with cancer-stricken children. During these interventions, the disease, treatment and precautionary measures needed for children with cancer returning the classroom are explained.

The Cancer Associations in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland, felt that the educational material used to explore this subject had become dated. So they joined forces and decided to hire us to refresh their communication media.

The challenge was to get children and adolescents talking; asking questions, expressing their doubts and anxiety when faced with their classmates’ illness.

In Switzerland, 250 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. It is the leading cause of death by illness among children. Swiss Cancer Associations make visits to classrooms with cancer-stricken children. During these interventions, the disease, treatment and precautionary measures needed for children with cancer returning the classroom are explained.

The Cancer Associations in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland, felt that the educational material used to explore this subject had become dated. So they joined forces and decided to hire us to refresh their communication media.

The challenge was to get children and adolescents talking; asking questions, expressing their doubts and anxiety when faced with their classmates’ illness.

In Switzerland, 250 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. It is the leading cause of death by illness among children. Swiss Cancer Associations make visits to classrooms with cancer-stricken children. During these interventions, the disease, treatment and precautionary measures needed for children with cancer returning the classroom are explained.

The Cancer Associations in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland, felt that the educational material used to explore this subject had become dated. So they joined forces and decided to hire us to refresh their communication media.

The challenge was to get children and adolescents talking; asking questions, expressing their doubts and anxiety when faced with their classmates’ illness.

In Switzerland, 250 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. It is the leading cause of death by illness among children. Swiss Cancer Associations make visits to classrooms with cancer-stricken children. During these interventions, the disease, treatment and precautionary measures needed for children with cancer returning the classroom are explained.

The Cancer Associations in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland, felt that the educational material used to explore this subject had become dated. So they joined forces and decided to hire us to refresh their communication media.

The challenge was to get children and adolescents talking; asking questions, expressing their doubts and anxiety when faced with their classmates’ illness.

In Switzerland, 250 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. It is the leading cause of death by illness among children. Swiss Cancer Associations make visits to classrooms with cancer-stricken children. During these interventions, the disease, treatment and precautionary measures needed for children with cancer returning the classroom are explained.

The Cancer Associations in the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland, felt that the educational material used to explore this subject had become dated. So they joined forces and decided to hire us to refresh their communication media.

The challenge was to get children and adolescents talking; asking questions, expressing their doubts and anxiety when faced with their classmates’ illness.

Our approach

Our approach

Our approach

Our approach

We created a fun, colourful and reassuring universe to loosen up the atmosphere and encourage discussion. Each subject is presented through its own short, captivating video; radiotherapy is portrayed as a spaceship firing on cancer cells, chemotherapy is portrayed as a potion that destroys sick cells, with the narrative line linking them all together.

The characters were designed to not look too “human”, making it easier to introduce and speak openly about sensitive subjects like the loss of hair or nausea without stigmatising the children with cancer. The use of 3D animation gives them a style all their own, both original and contemporary.

We created a fun, colourful and reassuring universe to loosen up the atmosphere and encourage discussion. Each subject is presented through its own short, captivating video; radiotherapy is portrayed as a spaceship firing on cancer cells, chemotherapy is portrayed as a potion that destroys sick cells, with the narrative line linking them all together.

The characters were designed to not look too “human”, making it easier to introduce and speak openly about sensitive subjects like the loss of hair or nausea without stigmatising the children with cancer. The use of 3D animation gives them a style all their own, both original and contemporary.

We created a fun, colourful and reassuring universe to loosen up the atmosphere and encourage discussion. Each subject is presented through its own short, captivating video; radiotherapy is portrayed as a spaceship firing on cancer cells, chemotherapy is portrayed as a potion that destroys sick cells, with the narrative line linking them all together.

The characters were designed to not look too “human”, making it easier to introduce and speak openly about sensitive subjects like the loss of hair or nausea without stigmatising the children with cancer. The use of 3D animation gives them a style all their own, both original and contemporary.

We created a fun, colourful and reassuring universe to loosen up the atmosphere and encourage discussion. Each subject is presented through its own short, captivating video; radiotherapy is portrayed as a spaceship firing on cancer cells, chemotherapy is portrayed as a potion that destroys sick cells, with the narrative line linking them all together.

The characters were designed to not look too “human”, making it easier to introduce and speak openly about sensitive subjects like the loss of hair or nausea without stigmatising the children with cancer. The use of 3D animation gives them a style all their own, both original and contemporary.

We created a fun, colourful and reassuring universe to loosen up the atmosphere and encourage discussion. Each subject is presented through its own short, captivating video; radiotherapy is portrayed as a spaceship firing on cancer cells, chemotherapy is portrayed as a potion that destroys sick cells, with the narrative line linking them all together.

The characters were designed to not look too “human”, making it easier to introduce and speak openly about sensitive subjects like the loss of hair or nausea without stigmatising the children with cancer. The use of 3D animation gives them a style all their own, both original and contemporary.

get-it-studio-childhood-cancer-communication-03
get-it-studio-childhood-cancer-communication-02

Results

Results

Results

Results

This entire visual universe was applied to three separate info kits, each one developed for a specific age group. Through colouring, the youngest are introduced to simple subjects such as the importance of washing one’s hands. The oldest get to watch the “What is cancer” video and participate in a PowerPoint presentation followed by a quiz.

At the end of the presentations, posters highlighting hygiene guidelines are given out to the teachers.

Pamphlets explaining how to welcome cancer-stricken to a school environment are also distributed to educational stakeholders to help make the return to the classroom go as smoothly as possible.

This entire visual universe was applied to three separate info kits, each one developed for a specific age group. Through colouring, the youngest are introduced to simple subjects such as the importance of washing one’s hands. The oldest get to watch the “What is cancer” video and participate in a PowerPoint presentation followed by a quiz.

At the end of the presentations, posters highlighting hygiene guidelines are given out to the teachers.

Pamphlets explaining how to welcome cancer-stricken to a school environment are also distributed to educational stakeholders to help make the return to the classroom go as smoothly as possible.

This entire visual universe was applied to three separate info kits, each one developed for a specific age group. Through colouring, the youngest are introduced to simple subjects such as the importance of washing one’s hands. The oldest get to watch the “What is cancer” video and participate in a PowerPoint presentation followed by a quiz.

At the end of the presentations, posters highlighting hygiene guidelines are given out to the teachers.

Pamphlets explaining how to welcome cancer-stricken to a school environment are also distributed to educational stakeholders to help make the return to the classroom go as smoothly as possible.

This entire visual universe was applied to three separate info kits, each one developed for a specific age group. Through colouring, the youngest are introduced to simple subjects such as the importance of washing one’s hands. The oldest get to watch the “What is cancer” video and participate in a PowerPoint presentation followed by a quiz.

At the end of the presentations, posters highlighting hygiene guidelines are given out to the teachers.

Pamphlets explaining how to welcome cancer-stricken to a school environment are also distributed to educational stakeholders to help make the return to the classroom go as smoothly as possible.

This entire visual universe was applied to three separate info kits, each one developed for a specific age group. Through colouring, the youngest are introduced to simple subjects such as the importance of washing one’s hands. The oldest get to watch the “What is cancer” video and participate in a PowerPoint presentation followed by a quiz.

At the end of the presentations, posters highlighting hygiene guidelines are given out to the teachers.

Pamphlets explaining how to welcome cancer-stricken to a school environment are also distributed to educational stakeholders to help make the return to the classroom go as smoothly as possible.

Explainer video
What is cancer?

get-it-studio-childhood-cancer-communication-print-04

Powerpoint presentation

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Leaflet
Back to School and Cancer-Stricken Children

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Poster
9 Steps To Wash Your Hands Properly 

Poster
9 Steps To Wash Your Hands Properly 

get-it-studio-childhood-cancer-communication-print-02

Poster
Cough and sneeze

Final Frames

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Client
Ligues romandes contre le cancer

Services
Concept / Art Direction / 3D design & animation / Graphic design

Credits
Direction: Get it studio
Production: Get it studio
Agency: Get it studio

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Interested in working together?Get in touch!
hello@get-it.studio

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